mediumaevum:

The Vatican’s Precious Manuscripts Go Online

Almost 600 years after Pope Nicholas V founded the Vatican Apostolic Library, the Holy See is now turning to 50 experts, five scanners and a Japanese IT firm to digitize millions of pages from its priceless manuscripts, opening them to the broader public for the first time.

Read more on WSJ

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thebrainscoop:

Oh, that raccoon.  Always up to no good. 
I receive quite a bit of anonymous criticism for using this specimen in the way we do - putting antlers on him, moving him around on a snare drum, using him in a time lapse.  Our handling of this particular object tends to make some uncomfortable, which I can understand.  After all, it is a museum specimen, and most understand the incalculable value we place on museum artifacts. I mean, it’s in a museum. 
I don’t know if these people want me to defend myself, or stop what I’m doing, or just admit that I’m a terrible person and how dare I?  The way I see this specimen - this one, specifically - it has no data, no lineage.  We don’t know where it came from, or when.  It’s not even put together well; his eyes are rocks.  Literally, he has rocks in his eyes.  Perhaps that adds to his value, perhaps I’m not treating him with the reverence he needs — but we have an entire collection of teaching specimens that can be handled as such, and he belongs to that. How much we value an item is an amount we assign to it.  After this series is over his value increases from a space-waster living behind a cabinet to the token raccoon of The Brain Scoop.  Worthy of living his days out on display, even.  
I see his sacrifice - if that’s what you want to call it - part of our message to raise awareness about natural history museums and zoological collections.  Personally, I am way more upset that we have 3,200 flammable specimens stored in an electrical room and no one is sending me inflammatory messages about that, nobody is demanding I move those fish today, or how dare I live with myself knowing they remain in such instability?  These are specimens that I know are over 100 years old; we know where and when they came from, and who collected them.  We have journals about them, publications citing them.  I’m not saying what we do with the raccoon is ‘okay’ because some will always be against us on this, and that’s fine.  But the way I see it, if I need to use one ratty raccoon as part of my mission to create a collective invested interest in preserving a greater collection, then I’m going to do it. 

An oldie but a goodie from @thebrainscoop.

thebrainscoop:

Oh, that raccoon.  Always up to no good. 

I receive quite a bit of anonymous criticism for using this specimen in the way we do - putting antlers on him, moving him around on a snare drum, using him in a time lapse.  Our handling of this particular object tends to make some uncomfortable, which I can understand.  After all, it is a museum specimen, and most understand the incalculable value we place on museum artifacts. I mean, it’s in a museum

I don’t know if these people want me to defend myself, or stop what I’m doing, or just admit that I’m a terrible person and how dare I?  The way I see this specimen - this one, specifically - it has no data, no lineage.  We don’t know where it came from, or when.  It’s not even put together well; his eyes are rocks.  Literally, he has rocks in his eyes.  Perhaps that adds to his value, perhaps I’m not treating him with the reverence he needs — but we have an entire collection of teaching specimens that can be handled as such, and he belongs to that. How much we value an item is an amount we assign to it.  After this series is over his value increases from a space-waster living behind a cabinet to the token raccoon of The Brain Scoop.  Worthy of living his days out on display, even.  

I see his sacrifice - if that’s what you want to call it - part of our message to raise awareness about natural history museums and zoological collections.  Personally, I am way more upset that we have 3,200 flammable specimens stored in an electrical room and no one is sending me inflammatory messages about that, nobody is demanding I move those fish today, or how dare I live with myself knowing they remain in such instability?  These are specimens that I know are over 100 years old; we know where and when they came from, and who collected them.  We have journals about them, publications citing them.  I’m not saying what we do with the raccoon is ‘okay’ because some will always be against us on this, and that’s fine.  But the way I see it, if I need to use one ratty raccoon as part of my mission to create a collective invested interest in preserving a greater collection, then I’m going to do it. 

An oldie but a goodie from @thebrainscoop.

missalsfromiram:

A 1914 photo of Ishi, the last native North American to live completely outside of modern Western society. In 1911, with no surviving family members, he emerged from “the wild” near Oroville, California. He was the last member of the Yahi, themselves the last surviving group of the Yana people. He died in 1916 of tuberculosis.

Ishi simply means “man” in the Yana language; when asked his name, Ishi responded: “I have none, because there were no people to name me.”

(via valdanderthal)

romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.
Thanks for visiting! romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.
Thanks for visiting! romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.
Thanks for visiting! romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.
Thanks for visiting! romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.
Thanks for visiting! romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.
Thanks for visiting!

romkids:

waitingforanewyear:

so my friends and I went to the Royal Ontario Museum last weekend…

Incredibly accurate recreations of ancient Greek statues.

Thanks for visiting!

biomedicalephemera:

Layered plate from “Man: His Structure and Physiology” by Robert Knox
Robert Knox is the Edinburgh anatomist who, based upon the 16 bodies delivered to him by William Burke and William Hare, gave spirited dissections in surgical theaters and illustrated this anatomy book. So “involved” and gruesome was he in the dissections that when John James Audubon attended one of his lectures, he remarked:

"The sights were extremely disagreeable, many of them shocking beyond all I ever thought could be. I was glad to leave this charnel house and breathe again the salubrious atmosphere of the streets".

While Hare turned face and testified against Burke, who was eventually put to death (and publicly dissected, himself), Robert Knox was later acquitted of any involvement with the murders, and of any knowledge regarding the origin of the bodies. The public of Edinburgh disagreed with the court, and drove him out of town.
Though Knox has long been associated with the pair, and he should probably have taken more care in asking where the bodies came from, the light of history has shown that he did nothing illegal or untoward, especially in a day where cadavers were extremely difficult to legally come by. His enthusiasm for “continental” anatomy courses, where students also dissect bodies, was his downfall - so many bodies were needed that it was impossible to procure them all.
After the Burke and Hare fiasco, Scotland widened the availability of cadavers to anatomists with the Anatomy Act of 1832. Robert Knox had since left for London by that point, however, and spent the remainder of his days illustrating medical and zoological texts, performing pathological anatomy, and writing about his questionable theories on race, speciation, and anthropometry.
This copy of Robert Knox’s book resides at the Horniman Museum & Gardens in London, England.
The Horniman Museum can also be found on tumblr and Flickr.

Photos that I took and uploaded for work, now being used for ace history Tumbling. This is my happy. biomedicalephemera:

Layered plate from “Man: His Structure and Physiology” by Robert Knox
Robert Knox is the Edinburgh anatomist who, based upon the 16 bodies delivered to him by William Burke and William Hare, gave spirited dissections in surgical theaters and illustrated this anatomy book. So “involved” and gruesome was he in the dissections that when John James Audubon attended one of his lectures, he remarked:

"The sights were extremely disagreeable, many of them shocking beyond all I ever thought could be. I was glad to leave this charnel house and breathe again the salubrious atmosphere of the streets".

While Hare turned face and testified against Burke, who was eventually put to death (and publicly dissected, himself), Robert Knox was later acquitted of any involvement with the murders, and of any knowledge regarding the origin of the bodies. The public of Edinburgh disagreed with the court, and drove him out of town.
Though Knox has long been associated with the pair, and he should probably have taken more care in asking where the bodies came from, the light of history has shown that he did nothing illegal or untoward, especially in a day where cadavers were extremely difficult to legally come by. His enthusiasm for “continental” anatomy courses, where students also dissect bodies, was his downfall - so many bodies were needed that it was impossible to procure them all.
After the Burke and Hare fiasco, Scotland widened the availability of cadavers to anatomists with the Anatomy Act of 1832. Robert Knox had since left for London by that point, however, and spent the remainder of his days illustrating medical and zoological texts, performing pathological anatomy, and writing about his questionable theories on race, speciation, and anthropometry.
This copy of Robert Knox’s book resides at the Horniman Museum & Gardens in London, England.
The Horniman Museum can also be found on tumblr and Flickr.

Photos that I took and uploaded for work, now being used for ace history Tumbling. This is my happy. biomedicalephemera:

Layered plate from “Man: His Structure and Physiology” by Robert Knox
Robert Knox is the Edinburgh anatomist who, based upon the 16 bodies delivered to him by William Burke and William Hare, gave spirited dissections in surgical theaters and illustrated this anatomy book. So “involved” and gruesome was he in the dissections that when John James Audubon attended one of his lectures, he remarked:

"The sights were extremely disagreeable, many of them shocking beyond all I ever thought could be. I was glad to leave this charnel house and breathe again the salubrious atmosphere of the streets".

While Hare turned face and testified against Burke, who was eventually put to death (and publicly dissected, himself), Robert Knox was later acquitted of any involvement with the murders, and of any knowledge regarding the origin of the bodies. The public of Edinburgh disagreed with the court, and drove him out of town.
Though Knox has long been associated with the pair, and he should probably have taken more care in asking where the bodies came from, the light of history has shown that he did nothing illegal or untoward, especially in a day where cadavers were extremely difficult to legally come by. His enthusiasm for “continental” anatomy courses, where students also dissect bodies, was his downfall - so many bodies were needed that it was impossible to procure them all.
After the Burke and Hare fiasco, Scotland widened the availability of cadavers to anatomists with the Anatomy Act of 1832. Robert Knox had since left for London by that point, however, and spent the remainder of his days illustrating medical and zoological texts, performing pathological anatomy, and writing about his questionable theories on race, speciation, and anthropometry.
This copy of Robert Knox’s book resides at the Horniman Museum & Gardens in London, England.
The Horniman Museum can also be found on tumblr and Flickr.

Photos that I took and uploaded for work, now being used for ace history Tumbling. This is my happy.

biomedicalephemera:

Layered plate from “Man: His Structure and Physiology” by Robert Knox

Robert Knox is the Edinburgh anatomist who, based upon the 16 bodies delivered to him by William Burke and William Hare, gave spirited dissections in surgical theaters and illustrated this anatomy book. So “involved” and gruesome was he in the dissections that when John James Audubon attended one of his lectures, he remarked:

"The sights were extremely disagreeable, many of them shocking beyond all I ever thought could be. I was glad to leave this charnel house and breathe again the salubrious atmosphere of the streets".

While Hare turned face and testified against Burke, who was eventually put to death (and publicly dissected, himself), Robert Knox was later acquitted of any involvement with the murders, and of any knowledge regarding the origin of the bodies. The public of Edinburgh disagreed with the court, and drove him out of town.

Though Knox has long been associated with the pair, and he should probably have taken more care in asking where the bodies came from, the light of history has shown that he did nothing illegal or untoward, especially in a day where cadavers were extremely difficult to legally come by. His enthusiasm for “continental” anatomy courses, where students also dissect bodies, was his downfall - so many bodies were needed that it was impossible to procure them all.

After the Burke and Hare fiasco, Scotland widened the availability of cadavers to anatomists with the Anatomy Act of 1832. Robert Knox had since left for London by that point, however, and spent the remainder of his days illustrating medical and zoological texts, performing pathological anatomy, and writing about his questionable theories on race, speciation, and anthropometry.

This copy of Robert Knox’s book resides at the Horniman Museum & Gardens in London, England.

The Horniman Museum can also be found on tumblr and Flickr.

Photos that I took and uploaded for work, now being used for ace history Tumbling. This is my happy.

What is a curator?

beautyofscience:

What is a curator? #MuseumBlogger #Museums

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What is a curator?

Every so often I’ll meet someone who asks me what I do; this draws the response “I’m a natural history curator”*. Sometimes I will then be faced with the dreaded follow-up question “what does that mean?”

I hate it when this happens, because the curatorial role involves lots of different things and it can be hard to summarise them in any kind of concise and intelligible way.…

View On WordPress

Excellent blog from our Deputy Keeper of Natural History, on what being a Curator means for him.

Hey Theodore Roosevelt, remember that time someone tried to assassinate you, but you just laughed and proceeded to give a 90-minute long speech with the bullet lodged in your lung, where it remained for the rest of your life? Or when you tore up your leg after being thrown into piranha-infested waters while exploring uncharted Brazil? Or all those times you broke your ribs from falling off horses while doing badass jumps? Or when you destroyed the sight in your left eye in a White House boxing match? Or that time you killed a cougar in a knife fight (seriously)? And how the only way death could finally get to you was in your sleep, in the early morning on January 6th in 1919. Here’s to TR as the infinite inspiration for pure, condensed badassery.

lilyliqueur:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

alexandraplumpkin:

furnweh:

image

Theodore Roosevelt, October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919

“Death had to take him sleeping, for if Roosevelt had been awake there would have been a fight.”

Original Badass.

All of our presidents combined can’t add up to how much of a badass he was.

TR Appreciation Post ‘12

Not to mention he was an attractive mother fucker.

image And most importantly, he rode Moose.

(via enthusispastic)

How to get the heritage job of your dreams: 9 top tips from Historical Honey