hipsterinatardis:

electricalice:

mrsbeefheart:

I fukin love 14th century art art because everyone looks so shady and suspicious of ppl around them its AMAZING

image

image

image

or just like they know something u dont and oh my gdfuck i cant

I believe the highest point is reached in Simone Martini’s Annunciation

image

and the look of absolute hatred Mary and Gabriel exchange. 

image

image

"mary i know ur only half a virgin"
"fuck off gabriel"

(via lostinhistory)

amnhnyc:

This image shows the 1947 progression of a mount for the Wolf Diorama in the Jill and Lewis Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals.
It begins with the positioning of the skeleton, then modeling the wolf form with plaster of paris, followed by the making of a cast, ending with a completed paper manikin which the wolf skin is fitted over. 
Learn more in this video series about the restoration of the Hall of North American Mammals.

amnhnyc:

This image shows the 1947 progression of a mount for the Wolf Diorama in the Jill and Lewis Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals.

It begins with the positioning of the skeleton, then modeling the wolf form with plaster of paris, followed by the making of a cast, ending with a completed paper manikin which the wolf skin is fitted over. 

Learn more in this video series about the restoration of the Hall of North American Mammals.

lostinhistory:

Part of my job is cleaning up the artifact database, because it’s full of stuff like this:

image

Yes, thank you, that is enormously helpful.

Museum databases, everybody.

(Insider secret: they’re ALL full of stuff like this)

medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better. medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.
Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.
Oh, and by the way…
Tudor:

Elizabethan:

Stuart:

Georgian:

Regency:

Victorian:

Edwardian:

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!
…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.
People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better.

medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.

Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.

Oh, and by the way…

Tudor:

image

Elizabethan:

image

Stuart:

image

Georgian:

image

Regency:

image

Victorian:

image

Edwardian:

image

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!

…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.

People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

Tumblr made this post better.

lostinhistory:

engrprof:

runecestershire:

lyrangalia:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

voltisubito:

Who the frell named the Sahara Desert anyway

Sahara is just the Arabic word for “deserts”

You fucking named it the Desert Desert

way to fucking go

chai tea

I’ll take “European Imperialists Who Never Bothered To Translate The Local Languages” for $200, Alex.

It also happens when Europeans encroach on other Europeans. Hence River Avon (Avon being an Anglification of Celtic abona, which means river).

The idea is that the new guys show up, point to the river, and ask, “what’s that?” and the locals answer, “the river”, and they mistake the word for a proper name, and go around calling it the River River. It happens a LOT.

“The forest of Skund was indeed enchanted, which was nothing unusual on the Disc, and was also the only forest in the whole universe to be called — in the local language — Your Finger You Fool, which was the literal meaning of the word Skund.

The reason for this is regrettably all too common. When the first explorers from the warm lands around the Circle Sea travelled into the chilly hinterland they filled in the blank spaces on their maps by grabbing the nearest native, pointing at some distant landmark, speaking very clearly in a loud voice, and writing down whatever the bemused man told them. Thus were immortalised in generations of atlases such geographical oddities as Just A Mountain, I Don’t Know, What? and, of course, Your Finger You Fool.

Rainclouds clustered around the bald heights of Mt. Oolskunrahod (‘Who is this Fool who does Not Know what a Mountain is’) and the Luggage settled itself more comfortably under a dripping tree, which tried unsuccessfully to strike up a conversation.”

Terry Pratchett, The Light Fantastic

The  name of my country translates to ‘village’, because it was assumed that the natives were welcoming them to the country and not, you know, the village.

startofline:

imageI’ll certainly miss the views…

Almost three years after I joined, today is my last day at Royal Museums Greenwich. I’ve done a million things in my time there, so there had to be something of use for my blog. Yesterday I got talking to our volunteer, she’s studying for her MA and looking to…

Some great tips for anyone looking to work with digital + museums.

thebrainscoop:

There is absolutely no way to determine a species’ identification without collecting a specimen. Our technology is just not that sophisticated; there is a major misconception there that we’ve all got portable, fully-efficient laboratories and equipment that can be hauled into the field, readily available and accessible. We don’t. Nobody does. And there’s absolutely no way to ensure an area will be conserved if it is not determined beforehand and established firmly that there are species in that area which warrant conservation. In order to do that, legislation requires that biologists prove the inherent value of biodiversity in said area. And they aren’t going to set aside acres and hectares of land for conservation on the basis of someone’s field photograph and a vague assumption that there might be a species of concern in that area. That just isn’t how it works.

This is the importance of communicating science so we don’t have a majority that look at stories like this and jump to the conclusion that curators and researchers are maniacally out in the field, blood-thirsty and without regard towards conservation. That’s just not what museums do. In fact, it’s completely against our mission. 

This is also why I felt the need to make our latest video: Where’d you get all those dead animals?

Earlier this year a conservator at the Hamilton Kerr Institute made a surprising discovery while working on a painting owned by the Fitzwilliam Museum. As Shan Kuany removed the old varnish from the surface, she revealed the whale that had been the intended focus of the scene.

ourpresidents:

An Immersive Exhibit of D-Day and the Normandy Landings
“D-Day and the Normandy Invasion” is an exhibit in the Google Cultural Institute that explores wartime photos, moving pictures, audio, and documents from the largest amphibious invasion in history.
Declassified cables, reports, and maps that were critical in planning the invasion are set against high resolution photos taken by combat photographers. The exhibit features over forty multi-media items including:
The military conclusion signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin to choreograph a “cover plan to mystify and mislead the enemy…”
The patent for the strategically important “Higgins” boat that would transport military equipment to the beaches. 
The audio recording of General Eisenhower delivering his “Order of the Day” for Allied Forces.
D-Day on the Google Cultural Institute
ourpresidents:

An Immersive Exhibit of D-Day and the Normandy Landings
“D-Day and the Normandy Invasion” is an exhibit in the Google Cultural Institute that explores wartime photos, moving pictures, audio, and documents from the largest amphibious invasion in history.
Declassified cables, reports, and maps that were critical in planning the invasion are set against high resolution photos taken by combat photographers. The exhibit features over forty multi-media items including:
The military conclusion signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin to choreograph a “cover plan to mystify and mislead the enemy…”
The patent for the strategically important “Higgins” boat that would transport military equipment to the beaches. 
The audio recording of General Eisenhower delivering his “Order of the Day” for Allied Forces.
D-Day on the Google Cultural Institute
ourpresidents:

An Immersive Exhibit of D-Day and the Normandy Landings
“D-Day and the Normandy Invasion” is an exhibit in the Google Cultural Institute that explores wartime photos, moving pictures, audio, and documents from the largest amphibious invasion in history.
Declassified cables, reports, and maps that were critical in planning the invasion are set against high resolution photos taken by combat photographers. The exhibit features over forty multi-media items including:
The military conclusion signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin to choreograph a “cover plan to mystify and mislead the enemy…”
The patent for the strategically important “Higgins” boat that would transport military equipment to the beaches. 
The audio recording of General Eisenhower delivering his “Order of the Day” for Allied Forces.
D-Day on the Google Cultural Institute
ourpresidents:

An Immersive Exhibit of D-Day and the Normandy Landings
“D-Day and the Normandy Invasion” is an exhibit in the Google Cultural Institute that explores wartime photos, moving pictures, audio, and documents from the largest amphibious invasion in history.
Declassified cables, reports, and maps that were critical in planning the invasion are set against high resolution photos taken by combat photographers. The exhibit features over forty multi-media items including:
The military conclusion signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin to choreograph a “cover plan to mystify and mislead the enemy…”
The patent for the strategically important “Higgins” boat that would transport military equipment to the beaches. 
The audio recording of General Eisenhower delivering his “Order of the Day” for Allied Forces.
D-Day on the Google Cultural Institute
ourpresidents:

An Immersive Exhibit of D-Day and the Normandy Landings
“D-Day and the Normandy Invasion” is an exhibit in the Google Cultural Institute that explores wartime photos, moving pictures, audio, and documents from the largest amphibious invasion in history.
Declassified cables, reports, and maps that were critical in planning the invasion are set against high resolution photos taken by combat photographers. The exhibit features over forty multi-media items including:
The military conclusion signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin to choreograph a “cover plan to mystify and mislead the enemy…”
The patent for the strategically important “Higgins” boat that would transport military equipment to the beaches. 
The audio recording of General Eisenhower delivering his “Order of the Day” for Allied Forces.
D-Day on the Google Cultural Institute

ourpresidents:

An Immersive Exhibit of D-Day and the Normandy Landings

“D-Day and the Normandy Invasion” is an exhibit in the Google Cultural Institute that explores wartime photos, moving pictures, audio, and documents from the largest amphibious invasion in history.

Declassified cables, reports, and maps that were critical in planning the invasion are set against high resolution photos taken by combat photographers. The exhibit features over forty multi-media items including:

  • The military conclusion signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin to choreograph a “cover plan to mystify and mislead the enemy…”
  • The patent for the strategically important “Higgins” boat that would transport military equipment to the beaches. 
  • The audio recording of General Eisenhower delivering his “Order of the Day” for Allied Forces.

D-Day on the Google Cultural Institute

(via lostinhistory)